Plans

One of the things that I want to accomplish by either December or January, depending on fundage, is to start my own web site from this blog.  That means that I would be moving all of this to a plain .com, instead of a .wordpress.com site.  That obviously involves a lot of time and money.

Screen shot 2014-11-10 at 1.30.39 PM

Obviously, there is way more to it than that.  These are just broad points — I will update with more as time progresses. Maybe some of you might enjoy seeing the process (read: trial and error) involved in shifting a blog over to a self-hosted site.

Have you ever converted a WordPress, Blogger, or other blog into a self-hosted web site? What were the easiest and hardest parts? Any advice?

2 thoughts on “Plans

  1. Meghan, I moved my Blogspot/WordPress blog to my own domain, and I love it. I feel happier, more credible, and more easily recognized by people online. I use A Small Orange’s Tiny plan which is $35 a year for hosting, and Namecheap which is $10.87 a year for domain registration.

    One thing that wasn’t necessarily hard but just was unfamiliar was setting up nameservers for the first time, where you point your domain toward your hosting company, but the confirmation emails you get from your domain registrar and hosting company tell you what to do, and it’s pretty simple.

    Most major hosting companies including Dreamhost and A Small Orange have one-click installs of WordPress, so it only takes a few minutes to set up a new WP blog, and then you can import your posts from your previous blog and do pretty much everything from the familiar wp-admin dashboard.

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